Long Island Sound
Long Island Sound

When Adrian Block first entered the Long Island Sound estuary in the early 1600s, he discovered an unbelievably rich ecosystem teeming with birds, fish and wildlife. Today, the viability of this fragile ecosystem hangs in the balance. Intense development pressure, recreational demands, and various commercial and industrial enterprises are taking a heavy toll. In response, Audubon Connecticut, Audubon New York and Audubon's National Policy Office have joined forces to help restore and protect Long Island Sound and its watershed.

 

Audubon's Long Island Sound Campaign addresses the fundamental challenges of water quality restoration and habitat protection - - two key areas where improvements will result in the most significant benefits to people, birds, marine organisms, and other wildlife. The Audubon partnership will bring needed resources to help restore marshes, beaches and islands, and improve water quality. The Campaign will further focus on protecting critical habitat for Piping Plovers, Roseate Terns, Saltmarsh Sharp-tailed Sparrows, waterfowl, and other priority species, to re-create the Sound as it once was - a critical breeding, migratory, and wintering habitat on the Atlantic flyway.